Brutal Simplicity of Thought

On July 22, 2013, in Heather Bussing, HRExaminer, Reviews, by Heather Bussing

How did two wheels emancipate women? When bicycles became available in the 1880’s, women did not have to rely on men for transportation. The bicycle became their freedom machine.

How did two wheels emancipate women? When bicycles became available in the 1880’s, women did not have to rely on men for transportation. “The bicycle became their freedom machine.”

How did two wheels emancipate women?

When bicycles became available in the 1880’s, women did not have to rely on men for transportation. “The bicycle became their freedom machine.”

Brutal Simplicity of Thought by advertising genius Maurice Saatchi asks you to look at things, questions, and their connections in new ways.

Here’s a two minute video showing a series of pages from the book.

Each page has a question, one image, and a brief answer. The book is mostly blank space. On purpose.

Every question is tied to a simple answer that made something new possible, or allowed us to see things from a different perspective.

What laid the foundation for the skyscraper? The elevator.

Can it be quicker to go through solid rock?  The London Underground.

How can a photo change a main street? A picture of the earth from space showed us a world without political boundaries, and global companies were born.

Here are some questions I asked myself after reading the book.

What have I made too complicated?

Where have I limited my thinking to boundaries that don’t really exist?

What obstacles are really the solution?

Do I have enough blank space in my day and in my head?

 
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