091018 Recruiting.com

On October 19, 2009, in HRExaminer, John Sumser, Reviews, by John Sumser

Recruiting.com

This past week, I had a couple of very nice (related) surprises.

Jeff Seely, CEO of Recruiting.com (nee Jobster), called and we had a delightful conversation about the joys of taking over and remaking a high-flying company. Seely, who is a seasoned entrepreneur, took the helm of Jobster as Jason Goldberg was making his exit. Goldberg, you might recall, was a high profile entrepreneur who vaulted the Jobster brand into prominence through a combination of chutzpa and market brilliance.

While I am a staunch Goldberg fan, I wouldn’t want the job of following in his footsteps at Jobster. Goldberg radically improved the HR marketplace by making it okay to be over the top and at the edge. Jobster clients were treated to a visionary feast. It was always a little tricky to distinguish the CEO from the brand.

When Jeff took the helm, he faced a complex challenge. How would he maximize the value embedded in the company while shifting its market position away from a personality-centric brand. With a sharp eye on finances (the company is now about 25 people), Seely looked at the market to figure out what it needed.

The result is the product I saw demoed at the end of the week. Now carrying the Recruiting.com brand, the company is releasing version 1.0 of its new offering.

Let me tell you something: It’s worth your attention.

The new Recruiting.com tool is what I’ll call a ‘post-sourcing system’. Once you’ve harnessed a talent pool through all of the means possible (sourcing), you have a problem. What do you do with the disparate pieces and how do you track, supplement and refine the data?

The core insight is that most people can not manage candidates using their ATS. For whatever reason, the ATS resume databases are hard to search and hard to manage. The Recruiting.com offering adds a search layer, supplemented with semantic capabilities and allows you to merge candidates form other sources.

So, if you want to evaluate people who have applied plus potential candidates from LinkedIn plus a flock of resumes you’ve discovered using Shally’s methods (or Ami’s G-Recruiter), you can merge all of the data in the Recruiting.com sandbox and begin to assess what you have.

It’s a simple and brilliant insight.

The offering has four pieces:

  • Candidate Aggregation

    You can blend ATS candidates plus people who express interest through a “lite form” plus people found elsewhere plus biz card data entry and a browser based emailed resume indexer. With all candidates from all sources in one easy to use searchable database, you can be certain you are looking at every asset available to your organization. The data is segmented with semantic tools.

  • Candidate Relationship Management

    This is the weakest part of the offering (but adequate for a rev 1.0 release). No workflow and no status management but the rudiments of messaging and communicating are embedded in the tool.

  • Data Enrichment and Augmentation

    This is the cool stuff. All candidates in the database are compared and contrasted with a large universe of online information.
    The Recruiter gets to decide which data is appropriate. Find candidate websites, profiles and so on.

  • Reporting

    The reporting module offers just enough functionality to make the value of the system clear.

Every form of candidate information has a different level of value that can be extracted. The Recruiting.com team has worked hard to understand the relative value of this piece of information versus that. The goal is to deliver a system that maximizes a Recruiter’s ability to harness that value.

It’s an amazing start and what looks like the beginnings of a great second chapter in the firm’s history. It’s worth your time to try to get a demo.


Many of you know that I worked for Jobster for a year as the editor of Recruiting.com. It was an interesting (if uneventful) assignment that left me with a pocketful of Jobster shares. Since I was never able to exactly figure out what the company did, I never thought much about the stock. Given the volume of money that went through the company, I’m sure my teensy stake is not really worth very much.


This is the beginning of a regular feature reviewing new technology and tools. If you’d like to demo your software or show your new tool, let us know.



 
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