With hundreds, maybe even thousands of communications tools at your disposal, what in the world do you do? It will certainly feel overwhelming unless you have a strategy for dealing with the noise level.

With hundreds, maybe even thousands of communications tools at your disposal, what in the world do you do? It will certainly feel overwhelming unless you have a strategy for dealing with the noise level.

Communications Channels II

So with hundreds, maybe even thousands of communications tools at your disposal, what in the world do you do? One definition of psychosis is an overabundance of choice. It will certainly feel overwhelming unless you have a strategy for dealing with the noise level.

Having a clear recruiting plan is more important than ever.

Where you recruit is never, ever a question of what’s new or what everyone else is doing. Recruiting always involves directly communicating with the people you want to hire. What matters is the potential candidates and their preferences.

The new assortment of channels requires focus. The old (modeled after employment classified ads) required volume. In the good ole days, constrained choice made spending decisions easier.

Today’s bewildering array of possibilities requires testing and patience. The core question is ‘Can I reach the candidates I want to reach using this channel?” Then it’s “Can I reach the right candidates at the right price point.

(One of the rarely mentioned facets of the explosion in communications channels is that it is getting more and more expensive to reach prospects. That means that each tweet, ad, posting, referral, call or radio spot has to be clearly and directly targeted. It would be very useful to have a directional (as opposed to accurate) estimate of the response rate.)

So, the first step is figuring out who you are going to be recruiting (the aforementioned plan).

While you can get all fussed up about precision (and spend a bunch of time and resources trying to be perfect), a good estimate of recruiting requirements is pretty easy to come by.

The Two Hour Workforce Plan in Seven Steps

  1. Figure out how many people work for the company in total. There’s probably someone right there in HR who knows.
  2. Identify the top 10 positions you want to recruit. Generally speaking you can make this number whatever constitutes 80% of the hiring. Usually, the categories are few.
  3. Try to figure out the attrition rate for each job. One way to do that (very roughly) is to take the number of people you hired in that position last year and divide by the number of people who are currently working at the company. Not perfect but close enough.
  4. As someone about growth plans. The company has some sort of growth objective. Take this number as a percentage.
  5. Multiply the number of people in each job by that job’s attrition rate. Multiply the number of people in each job by the growth rate. This will give you a pretty good estimate of the number of people (and what types) you’ll be recruiting this year.
  6. Take that number and divide it by 12. This will give you an estimate of level hiring.
  7. Give some thought to questions of seasonality (shopping schedules, holidays, graduation dates) and adjust monthly targets accordingly.

That’s all there is to it. You might have to have this exercise done at various plants and facilities if you’re a really bug company.

Now you can start to think about the question “Where is the best place (and what is the best way) to reach these people. That’s where learning about the channels comes in.In article III, we start to look at ways to figure out which channels matter to you.

Communications Channels



 
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Communication Channels I

In the past six or seven years, the number of usable communications channels exploded. All of a sudden, there are...

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