Employee Retention Double Feature ~ HR Examiner Weekly Edition v 4.10 March 8, 2013 The idea that great people should be retained in their jobs for a long time is the exact opposite of growth and innovation. In Retaining Water, John Sumser opens this week's Employee Retention double feature by illustrating how a highly successful retention system has backfired on the U.S. Federal Government. In his follow up piece, Retaining Walls, John explores the risks of retention programs in greater depth. Heather Bussing writes Unintended Employees on the growing issues surrounding contractor and employee status, and John Sumser closes the issue with Five Links: Staying with the New and a review of last week's Tapestry Conference. Enjoy.  
Retaining WallsRetaining Walls Identifying key talent and promoting them is such a core part of conventional wisdom that we take it for granted. Most leaders aspire to be surrounded by trusted colleagues who are well seasoned and deeply experienced. Read Now »
 
Retaining WaterRetaining Water Successful retention programs caused the government to lose its touch with the real changing market dynamics of acquiring and maintaining employees. As a result, the restaffing of the government will require increased pay, modified benefits and a host of alternative approaches. Read Now »
 
Five Links: Staying with the New<br />
Five Links: Staying with the New The world is changing fast. This week’s links point to the global movement against high executive pay, complexity thinking, the importance of context in visualization, pay for play ethics and a review of last week’s Tapestry conference. Read Now »
 
Tapestry Tidbits ( #tapestryconf )Tapestry Tidbits ( #tapestryconf ) Last week, I spent a day in Nashville with the 100 brightest minds in graphic and narrative visualization. The subject is important to HR and the rest of the organization. As we get buried in massive volumes of information, graphic and narrative visualization techniques are the keys to survival. Read Now »
 
Unintended Employees by Heather BussingUnintended Employees by Heather Bussing “To show that someone is an independent contractor, you generally have to give independent contractors discretion over how they perform their work; and they usually work by the project instead of for an indefinite period.” – Heather Bussing Read Now »
Events, etc. Read-it-now  


 
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Five Links: Staying with the New

The world is changing fast. This week's links point to the global movement against high executive pay, complexity thinking, the...

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