Privacy: Drawing Lines

On November 12, 2014, in Big Data, Book Review, Data, Heather Bussing, HRExaminer, Privacy, by Heather Bussing

Take ten minutes and read Terms of Service: understanding our role in the World of Big Data by Michael Keller and Josh Neufeld. It’s cool. Terms of Service cover

It’s a comic book that gives some history on how internet and data privacy (or lack of concern for it) has developed politically and legally.

It also has a great, and pretty objective, discussion on what questions to ask yourself before you just tick the Agree box and start the download.

  • Do you know what data is being collected?
  • Do you know what it’s being used for?
  • Have you considered what it might be used for?
  • Is it common information about you that people know anyway?
  • Is it information you are comfortable having out there?

It’s a lot of information, do you care?

Different people have different perspectives on privacy and protecting data that is available to companies, the government, and people you don’t know.

Sometimes it is definitely worth trading information about my preferences or what I’m looking to buy in exchange for a more tailored search, access to information I might have to spend a long time finding, or simply a free app or product that makes my life easier.

Other times, I am less comfortable about companies making money from my existence without my clear knowledge and affirmative consent.

You don’t have to have strict rules about it. It’s okay to make the decision on a case by case basis, and to be inconsistent in your approaches. It’s your choice. Do what works for you.

But take ten minutes and read this well written and wonderfully illustrated comic book, so that you are making an informed choice.

Further Resources

Here is the Privacy Series John and I did.

Here is the series I did on workplace privacy.

Employee Privacy- What Can Employer’s Monitor?

The short answer is: A lot. If the device or hardware is the employer’s, including the smart phone issued by the company, the employer is entitled to monitor and track the data generated.

Employee Privacy 2- When It’s Personal

Employees do have some privacy rights though. This piece looks at where those rights originate and what questions to ask to figure out if something is protected.

Employee Privacy 3- Social Media

Social media seems intimate and among “friends,” but it’s not. This piece looks at how to think about privacy and social media at work.



 
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