Security Series 6 – The Future of Security Issues

On February 11, 2019, in HRExaminer, by John Sumser

 

2019-01-28-hrexaminer-photo-img-security-series-8-part-john-sumser-cc0-via-pexels-by-pixabay-cyber-security-cybersecurity-device-60504-edit-544x300px.jpg

“There can be an ironic relationship between scrutiny and secrecy; the more scrutiny (which can feel like a lack of trust), the more secrets are kept. In other words, surveillance can become a self-fulfilling prophecy that produces the very behavior it wants to eliminate.” – John Sumser

Security Series 6 – The Future of Security Issues

 
The balance between surveillance and independent action will be constantly evolving in the foreseeable future. Smarter objects that monitor and report on their usage and users are already proliferating. The devices will continue to shrink, get more powerful and be embedded in every nook and cranny of our lives.

It’s inevitable that the mere presence of these various ways of monitoring will be perceived as intrusive oversight. There can be an ironic relationship between scrutiny and secrecy; the more scrutiny (which can feel like a lack of trust), the more secrets are kept. In other words, surveillance can become a self-fulfilling prophecy that produces the very behavior it wants to eliminate. Worse yet, well-intentioned endeavors to understand and increase productivity can easily be seen as evidence of a lack of trust.

The implication is that we are going to need a way of thinking about the impact of adding new technologies to the workforce. Somehow, employers will need to demonstrate the value of increased monitoring to a workforce that is increasingly empowered and motivated to control individual privacy. It will take a disciplined and persistent approach to ensure that smarter workplaces don’t become breeding grounds for serious cultural problems.

Technical security threats are escalating at the same rate that the underlying technology is expanding. A severe shortage of security professionals (demand dramatically exceeds supply ) means the technical team is overworked and likely to miss things. Next year’s security pros will be pressed to keep up with the AI that will be managing core security questions.

Finally, our understanding of the definition of Personal Information and what, exactly, is protected under various regulatory schemes is constantly shifting. For example, the cross-device tracking necessary to ensure that a company’s virtual assistant can operate creates a digital signature that can easily be reference back to a single individual. The technical stack on an individual’s computer is a fingerprint that can be (and is) used to monitor the behavior of specific individuals. Knowing how to tell when we are creating Personal Information is a key to long term organizational risk mitigation.

In order to offset the risks that are accumulating for all of the aforementioned reasons, companies are going to look to their people as a solution to the security risk. Current emphases on engagement, culture and employee experience are all evidence of the shift organizations are making in the way the value and develop their people. There is a virtuous circle that connects increased security, workforce attachment and the content, ideas and products that make that relationship real.

 

==========

The Security Series: HR as Security Leader

1: Overview – Why Focus Your HR Department on Security? Link »
2: Introduction Link »
3: Context – Shifting Technology Link »
4: Context – Increasing Employee Power Link »
5: The Ecosystem of Security Issues Link »
6: The Future of Security Issues Link »
7: The HR Security Center of Excellence Link »
8: Getting Started Link »
 



 
Read previous post:
2019-02-08-hrexaminer-weekly-ed-v1006-feature-photo-img-security-series-8-part-john-sumser-cc0-via-pexels-by-pixabay-cyber-security-cybersecurity-device-60504-edit-sq-200px.jpg
HRExaminer v10.06

This week we dig deeper into the HR Examiner series on security from John Sumser. In parts III through V,...

Close